Cyclists push for more bike lanes on bridges

Hello Kitties: Winged lions form the base of a lamppost at Montague Street’s Chase Bank branch. Photo: Lore Croghan/Brooklyn Eagle

Cyclists push for more bike lanes on bridges

Bicycle advocates rallied last week to demand more bike lanes on the Brooklyn, Manhattan, Williamsburg and Queensboro bridges. “As people continue to venture out more in a safe and socially-distanced way, we need to provide more protected space for them to do so,” said Katherine Willis, an organizer for Transportation Alternatives’ new campaign Bridges4People. Bicycle trips on these four spans have increased more than 22 percent this August over August 2019. The activist want to remove two car lanes on the Brooklyn, Manhattan and Williamsburg bridges, according to the Brooklyn Paper.

Eugene to give out free food

Councilmember Mathieu Eugene (D-Crown Heights-East Flatbush-Flatbush, Kensington) is partnering with local organizations to provide free food and masks to residents facing food insecurity during the

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A New NYC Club of Black and Brown Cyclists Takes the Streets

Andrew Bennett, founder of the Good Company Bike Club, has one guiding rule for the group: “As long as you have good energy, you’re welcome to ride,” he says. Since late May, when he founded the biking group, he’s led dozens of rides throughout the city: to Roosevelt Island, to Coney Island, to Brooklyn Bridge Park, and to see the many Kobe Bryant murals that have popped up in the wake of his death. In early August, Bennett hosted one called “We Bike Too,” which spoke to the club’s mission to shine a light on the fact that biking, while more and more popular in the city, has a deservedly uninclusive reputation, all while working up a sweat, exploring different parts of town, and having a good time.

The ride began at the Brooklyn Museum, where some folks arrived on Citi Bikes, some came fully suited up in spandex, some

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Tales From the Trail: Two Local Cyclists Bike Entire Willapa Hills Trail | News

 

As an avid cyclist and president of Lewis County Community Trails, Chris Brewer had biked large sections of the Willapa Hills Trail countless times over the years — just never the complete route. So when board member Jon Gust sent him a text out of the blue last week asking if he’d be down to tackle the entire trail in one trip, he jumped at the chance.

“He said, ‘Hey, this weekend is what would have been the Mary Bridge Children’s Courage Ride. In place of the event, I’m going to ride from Chehalis to South Bend on the trail. Do you want to join?’” Brewer said. “I said, ‘Hey, let’s see how far we get and see what can be done.’”

The Willapa Hills Trail began as a railway line for the Northern Pacific Railway in the late 1800s, connecting South Bend to Chehalis, and even further on to

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Better infrastructure, education needed to make Regina bike-friendly: cyclists



a person riding on the back of a bicycle: Annabel Townsend, Owner of the Penny University which is currently operating as an online book seller, rides her delivery bike along the path in Les Sherman Park in Regina, Saskatchewan on August 19, 2020.


© BRANDON HARDER
Annabel Townsend, Owner of the Penny University which is currently operating as an online book seller, rides her delivery bike along the path in Les Sherman Park in Regina, Saskatchewan on August 19, 2020.

While biking in Regina, Annabel Townsend’s experiences range from pleasant to confusing to frightening.

She moved from Great Britain to Regina eight years ago and, having never needed a drivers license before, came to the Queen City without one. She still does not have a drivers license and uses her bicycle for everything, whether commuting to work, visiting friends or getting groceries.

But Regina is not designed with people like her in mind, she said. Many drivers do not know how to share the road with a cyclist, and she is often stuck riding on the road because of the city’s limited number of bike lanes.

“It feels like it was designed by

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Too many cyclists, not enough bikes for Motor City’s virus-weary

Published


John Hughes is busier than ever and still fretting about making ends meet. That’s because his Detroit-based cycling shop has plenty of customers, just not enough bikes.

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Moncton cyclists say city needs more protected bike lanes

MONCTON, N.B. —
Cyclists in Moncton are voicing their concerns about what they say is a lack of protected bike lanes in the hub city.

While traffic is back to normal on Moncton’s Main Street, the removal of the temporary bike lane now has some residents concerned for their safety.

“My daughter is starting kindergarten in a few weeks and I would love to be able to bike to school with her,” said Matthieu Wade. “As it is right now, either we go on the sidewalk, or I’m not comfortable doing so.”

The pilot project on Main was aimed at boosting foot traffic to downtown businesses during the pandemic. But the installation lasted only seven weeks after 26 retailers signed a petition asking for the barriers to be removed.

“It didn’t surprise me because it looked really bad and it didn’t work well,” said Mark Leblanc.

And while Leblanc may

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As bicycle demand soars amid pandemic, theft frustrates Montreal cyclists



a man standing next to a bicycle: Lamar Timmins with some of the bikes he has work to do on, at his bike shop in Griffintown on Monday Aug. 17, 2020. Timmins says that the prices of second hand bikes has gone up this summer.


© Pierre Obendrauf
Lamar Timmins with some of the bikes he has work to do on, at his bike shop in Griffintown on Monday Aug. 17, 2020. Timmins says that the prices of second hand bikes has gone up this summer.

Toula Drimonis couldn’t believe her eyes when she went to retrieve her bicycle from the garage Friday morning.

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Sometime during the night, thieves had entered her garage and absconded with her bike, along with 10 to 15 other bicycles belonging to residents of a St-Henri condo building.

“I was livid,” the Montreal freelance writer, editor and columnist said in an interview.

“You feel violated because it’s your personal property. My bike was my lifeline this summer because of Covid . I wasn’t taking public transit and am not comfortable going to the gym. I loved taking my bike out and going on long rides.”

Two days later,

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