Education

Bicycle Generator Project | Clean Energy Research and Education

Wind for Schools worked with several teachers who expressed interest in using bicycle generators to teach their students some fundamental concepts of energy and basic mechanical, engineering, and electrical principles. With this project we worked with K-12 and college students to organize hands-on design and construction of bike generators. We then used the bike generators in the classroom for fun demonstrations which increased students’ understanding and awareness of energy topics.





History of the project

In 2010, Jeff Hines, a local Flagstaff teacher who also served as the first WindSenator in Arizona, inspired us to pursue bicycle generators for use in K-12 classrooms. Shortly after, we learned of an NAU student, Matthew Petney, who had built a double-bike generator, which included a battery for energy storage and an inverter and outlet so normal 120-volt devices could be plugged into it. We purchased the system from Matt and shared it with several

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KSU Physics Education Bike Project

KSU Physics Education Bike Project

Scientific and Cultural Aspects of the Bicycle:

An International Pedagogical Project


 


This project is a multi-national effort to collaborate on the adaptation
and creation of pedagogical materials.  The bicycle, a highly developed
yet simple device, is the focus of this effort.  Students and faculty
are using materials developed in a variety of countries and creating new
materials using contemporary multimedia.  This effort began almost
15 years ago when Robert Fuller and Dean Zollman created the videodisc
Energy
Transformations featuring the Bicycle
at about the same time that the
PLON Project in The Netherlands developed the teaching module Traffic
and the British Open University developed a course on Materials and Structures
which featured the bicycle.  These efforts were independent of each
other.  Since that time we have worked to combine instructional materials
from these and other countries.
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