Pandemic

The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Forcing Cities To Rethink Public Transportation

As parts of Europe and the United States begin to lift coronavirus lockdown restrictions and allow people to go shopping, visit relatives and return to work, public officials are facing a new conundrum: How can people travel safely in crowded cities?

Italy is poised to serve as a major test case. On Sunday, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced that many restrictions on daily life will be eased starting next Monday, but he warned that people would still need to avoid large gatherings, maintain social distancing and wear masks in certain circumstances.

“If we do not respect the precautions, the curve will go up, the deaths will increase and we will have irreversible damage to our economy,” Conte said in a televised address to the nation. “If you love Italy, keep your distance.”

People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April 24 during a three-hour testing period of new measures designed



People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April

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Trek Bicycle National Study Reveals New & Emerging U.S. Cycling Behaviors During Coronavirus Pandemic

WATERLOO, Wis., April 17, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — As many Americans across the country are facing extended social distancing orders due to the COVID-19 pandemic, consumers are turning to cycling as an alternate means of essential transportation, for mental and physical health, and to keep the kids busy. Today, Trek Bicycle released new results from a nationally representative survey of over 1,000 American adults 18-years-old and over, conducted in partnership with research firm Engine Insights. The study explores how cycling behaviors and attitudes are shifting amidst the Coronavirus pandemic, with results revealing that bike riding is perceived as a “safer” activity and mode of transportation compared to public transit, and more people are biking than before.

(PRNewsfoto/Trek Bicycle Corporation)

Of Americans who own a bike, 21% of them have been riding more since the COVID-19 pandemic. This can be traced back to a need for less public and crowded forms of transportation, a

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Business is booming during pandemic for nonprofit bike shop helping everyone get a bicycle

TAMPA, Fla. — “The whole world wants bikes right now!”

It is safe to say Jon Dengler is the hardest-working man in Tampa’s University Mall right now.

The eerily-silent shopping center still hosts at least one bustling storefront: WellBuilt Bikes.

The shop is a nonprofit repurposing donated bikes and helps anyone get wheels, no matter their financial standing.

“I’ve been joking all week that our racks look like the toilet paper aisle!” says Dengler, who has a small dedicated staff helping him.

Business is booming at WellBuilt right now.

Well Built Bikes 2

WFTS

People without access to transportation are a big part of the clientele. Dengler says bus riders worried about the coronavirus are coming into the store for a safer alternative.

“And then we have all those people who are stuck in their houses and simply want to get outside for some exercise,” Dengler adds.

WellBuilt offers all bikes for all people.

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The safest modes of transportation during a pandemic, ranked

Using public transportation like the subway, a train, or bus can make it difficult to social distance or avoid touching shared surfaces.

subway coronavirus gloves

A person wearing gloves on a public subway train in New York City.

Braulio Jatar/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media/Getty Images


Due to subway line closures and fewer people on the subway, it may be easier to maintain distance between yourself and other passengers.

However, crowded subway cars, trains, and buses can quickly become a hotbed of contaminants due to high foot traffic and riders touching, sneezing, or coughing on shared surfaces.

In order to attempt to curb this, the MTA in New York City has modified its schedules for the Long Island Rail Road and the Metro-North Railroad, and strategically planned its subway line service during “peak” travel times.

“I understand people are trying to get somewhere, but no one should be getting on a crowded train,” Mayor Bill de

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Covid-19 impact: Automakers want flexible manufacturing for business after the pandemic

MUMBAI: Automakers are looking to fast-track plans for agile manufacturing processes and supply chains as they prepare for a volatile demand environment after the Covid-19 global pandemic.

In fast-moving mass production industries like automobiles, production schedules are rigid and optimised for efficiency. Similarly, supply chains work on schedules decided months in advance on the basis of demand projections. However, carmakers are now looking to redesign these systems to cater to an unpredictable demand environment.

Information technology firms servicing automakers said they have received requests from companies looking to quickly move to agile manufacturing processes and supply chains along with undertaking cost reduction initiatives.

Automakers are immediately interested in two initiatives, according to Maneesh Pant, vice president at Capgemini India. “One is continuing the broken supply chain, and another is making manufacturing more agile. Focus is shifting from pure production performance to surviving in an environment of unpredictable change by being

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Largo bicycle shop sees businesses booming amid pandemic

LARGO, Fla. (WFLA) – Dan Block has been getting quite the workout lately. Block owns the D & S Bicycle shop on Walsingham Road in Largo and the coronavirus has him working overtime.

“It’s been crazy. Everybody that got their bikes that they’ve had them,” said Block, who fixes those bikes regularly. “Or they buy them at Walmart and they want them assembled, and hey, I’ll do that.”

Dan Block has owned a bike shop in Pinellas County for 42-years and remembers the last time there was a boom in business like this one.

Block explains with the gyms and beaches closed, there are few places to go work out and now many choose to take a bike ride.

Block specializes in bike rentals and sells a few used bikes on the side, but lately, he can’t keep any used inventory in stock.

“I’m limited choices right now,” said Block.

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Manheim Continues Industry Support During Pandemic – Auctions

 - Photo: Manheim

Photo: Manheim

Manheim is providing discounts and waiving fees for its online services to support customers and clients whose businesses are impacted by closures as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a release from Manheim.

The company said it was waiving the sell fee on its Manheim Express app, which is for digital wholesale buying and selling, on all self-listed vehicles in April. It’s also offering independent auction discounts on OVE sales through May 31, and providing a 30-day complimentary trial for clients to Central Dispatch, which connects dealers, brokers, shippers and others directly with vehicle logistics carriers.

Manheim is also introducing a new weekend OVE event sale to motivated sellers willing to accept offers to move surplus inventory. Manheim is also supporting the roll-out of RideKleen’s new surface disinfecting and air cleansing service for dealers and fleet operators. This service is designed to drive customer confidence when

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COVID-19 and plant closures: The automotive industry’s response to the pandemic

Ferrari factory

Closed.


Ferrari
For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

As the novel coronavirus continues to spread across the world, automakers are taking extreme measures in the form of plant closures to halt the spread of COVID-19, the disease the coronavirus causes. The situation remains fluid as more European companies suspend work and US automakers extend shutdown periods.

Here are all the automakers and companies that have elected to halt production in the US and Europe so far. Information on Detroit’s Big Three begins our coverage, followed by all other shutdowns organized by the date automakers announced them.

Ford

Ford shut down all European and North American production on March 19 to help combat the spread of COVID-19. While Ford intended to reopen facilities and restart production on March 30, the company on March 31 delayed that goal indefinitely. However, it plans

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How Electric-Vehicle Startups Are Coping in Coronavirus Pandemic

  • Rivian, which has been talking up its electric truck and SUV (below), and Lucid, with its near-production Air luxury sedan (pictured above), have both had to reschedule events due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Some EV startups were in the middle of building factories when shelter-in-place orders were given.
  • The agility that is a characteristic of startup culture is keeping the work going at some of these companies.

    Update 4/8/20: The Chicago Tribune reports that Rivian’s delivery timeline for the electric R1T pickup has slipped to 2021 from 2020. The reason for the delay is that the retooling of the Normal, Illinois, plant has come to a standstill because of the coronavirus pandemic.

    At a time when traditional automakers with decades of manufacturing and selling vehicles under their belts are announcing that they’re extending their shutdown of operations, EV startups are in even more precarious position. Most don’t have the capital

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    Tuk Tuk EV RV Might Be The Perfect Vehicle For A Pandemic

    We’re currently going through the worst pandemic in recent history and most of the world is in lockdown inside their homes to prevent the virus from spreading. But what if your home had (three) wheels and an electric motor to move itself and you around so that you can apply the social distancing norms that are now in place?

    Meet the electric Xinge RV, which has to be one of the cutest, most adorable motorhomes we’ve ever seen. It’s a Chinese-made three-wheeler based on a tuk tuk chassis, but just like any recreational vehicle, it comes fully featured inside.

    It’s electric motor makes more than 800 watts, according to its listing on Alibaba, and it can push this 650 kg (1,433 lbs) vehicle to a top speed of 45 km/h (25 mph). The battery it draws from is not huge, a 7.2 kWh pack, but its range is not

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