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Los Angeles Public Transit | Discover Los Angeles

The City of Los Angeles Transportation (LADOT) currently operates the second largest fleet in Los Angeles County. LADOT’s transit fleet serves approximately 30 million passenger boardings per year.

DASH Downtown

Six quick bus routes through Downtown depart every five to 15 minutes between 5:50 a.m. and 6 p.m. on weekdays, and every six to 20 minutes between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

  •     Route A – Little Tokyo to City West
  •     Route B – Chinatown to Financial District
  •     Route D – Union Station to South Park
  •     Route E – City West to Fashion District
  •     Route F – Financial District to Exposition Park/USC

DASH also Serves:

  •     Beachwood Canyon
  •     Boyle Heights/East LA
  •     Chesterfield Square
  •     Crenshaw
  •     Downtown Los Angeles
  •     El Sereno/City Terrace
  •     Fairfax
  •     Highland Park/Eagle Rock
  •     Hollywood
  •     Hollywood/West Hollywood
  •     Hollywood/Wilshire
  •     King-East
  •     Leimert/Slauson
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Los Angeles: Public Transportation – Tripadvisor

Forget all the negative information about public traffic in LA. It’s just as good and safe as anywhere in the world. Take the bus and metro and see it’s fairly reliable and that drivers are friendly and polite (towards every person!). Same goes for security people. Just take that bus, stop complaining and meet the world!

There are over 200 metro bus lines and 6 metro rail lines in the Los Angeles area that are run by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro). You can get to almost anywhere in the developed parts of Los Angeles County on Metro and/or on other local transit services. Some transfers are quick and easy; others, less so.  Detailed information, along with a trip planner, can be found here: http://www.metro.net/default.asp

The  metro rail lines are:

1. Green line Metro Rail (above ground): Runs east/west between Norwalk and Redondo Beach with a stop

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Reopening California: Here’s how commuting will change for drivers, public transportation when we go back to work

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) — Commuting as we know it in the Bay Are will never be the same as before. As restrictions for the Bay Area’s shelter-in-place begin to lift, transit agencies are looking ahead to the future of commuting.

RELATED: Gov. Newsom teases Phase 3 of reopening California businesses is closer than we thought

Planned changes come as an eye-opening study from Vanderbilt is released, showing if three out of four workers chooses to take a car versus public transportation, drive times increase a whopping 42 minutes.

It’s one of the issues discussed during Thursday’s Bay Area Council webinar with heads of various transportation agencies.

One change already implemented March 20th: The Bay Area Toll Authority decision to switch to all electric tolls on area bridges. That could continue.

“It seems to be working relatively smoothly… We’ll work with the commission on how we’re going to work toward to

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The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Forcing Cities To Rethink Public Transportation

As parts of Europe and the United States begin to lift coronavirus lockdown restrictions and allow people to go shopping, visit relatives and return to work, public officials are facing a new conundrum: How can people travel safely in crowded cities?

Italy is poised to serve as a major test case. On Sunday, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced that many restrictions on daily life will be eased starting next Monday, but he warned that people would still need to avoid large gatherings, maintain social distancing and wear masks in certain circumstances.

“If we do not respect the precautions, the curve will go up, the deaths will increase and we will have irreversible damage to our economy,” Conte said in a televised address to the nation. “If you love Italy, keep your distance.”

People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April 24 during a three-hour testing period of new measures designed



People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April

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Hostile vehicle mitigation | Public Website

Vehicle-borne threats range from vandalism to sophisticated or aggressive attack by determined criminals or terrorists. The mobility and payload capacity of a vehicle offers a convenient delivery mechanism for a large explosive device, although the vehicle itself may be used as a weapon. This section contains guidance that will help practitioners determine the vehicle-borne threat, assess site strengths and vulnerabilities, and identify suitable options for Hostile Vehicle Mitigation (HVM) measures.

Determining the type of vehicle-borne threat being faced

When specifying the nature of the vehicle-borne threat it is important to understand:

  • Modus Operandi (MO) – this includes parked, penetrative, encroachment, deception and duress or a combination of attack methods including surreptitious and forcible attack on the barrier with hand tools or explosives
  • Threat vehicle(s) – unmodified road vehicles with specific characteristics – mass, speed and structure, as well as vehicle specific capabilities
  • Blast effect – especially if considering VBIED attack
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Transportation | Fairfax County Public Schools

The Office of Transportation Services is responsible for providing the safe and efficient transportation of all eligible students to and from schools and school activities each day. To accomplish this monumental task, a team of dedicated routing, safety, and administrative specialists combined with a host of drivers and attendants work together to maintain a high level of service for all of our clients.

Bus Transportation

Our dedicated team works together every day to ensure the safe transportation of our students. Safety is also the reason that we do not post school bus routes and bus stops on our website. If you need that information for your student, you must go in person to the school. Schools will mail bus schedules to families in August of each school year.

If you have concerns about your child’s school bus transportation, speak to the transportation supervisor responsible for your school or call the

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Essential workers at risk riding public transportation

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Some are hesitant to use public transportation during the coronavirus outbreak. Here’s what transportation officials are doing to help reduce risk.

USA TODAY

DENVER – Sisters Trinity and Kiki Williams looked around the crowded bus stop as the #15 bus rumbled down Colfax Avenue toward them. 

The bus looked to be about half full, the driver wearing a bandanna stretched across his nose and mouth to comply with government recommendations intended to help slow the spread of coronavirus. But among the awaiting passengers, only one wore a face covering.

“I’m damn nervous,” said Kiki Williams, 19. “There’s too many of us.”

For protection, the women, who are African American, wore blue rubber gloves but no masks. “We forgot them at home,” said Trinity Williams, 18.

Like millions of Americans, the Williams sisters depend on public transit at a time when health officials have told Americans to stay 6 feet

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Public Transportation – Miami International Airport

Access to MIA Mover is located on the 3rd level between the Dolphin and Flamingo garage. Get to your rental car fast by using the free MIA Mover, linking you directly to the Rental Car Center’s customer service lobby.

MIA Mover Map

MIA Mover

Trains depart every 30 minutes during the weekday, with more frequent service on the weekends every 15 minutes.

  • Green Line
    Board a Green Line train if you are traveling to Palmetto, Okeechobee, Hialeah, Tri-Rail, Northside, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. or Brownsville stations.
  • Orange Line
    Board an Orange Line train if you are traveling to Dadeland North, South Miami, University, Douglas Road, Coconut Grove, Vizcaya, Brickell, Government Center, Historic Overtown/Lyric Theatre, Culmer, Civic Center, Santa Clara, Allapattah or Earlington Heights stations.

For just $2.25 each way, local residents headed out-of-town can now leave behind all the traffic and parking hassles that come with driving to the airport. And out-of-towners at the

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Public transportation users at risk as coronavirus spreads across US

CLOSE

Some are hesitant to use public transportation during the coronavirus outbreak. Here’s what transportation officials are doing to help reduce risk.

USA TODAY

DENVER – Sisters Trinity and Kiki Williams looked around the crowded bus stop as the #15 bus rumbled down Colfax Avenue toward them. 

The bus looked to be about half full, the driver wearing a bandanna stretched across his nose and mouth to comply with government recommendations intended to help slow the spread of coronavirus. But among the awaiting passengers, only one wore a face covering.

“I’m damn nervous,” said Kiki Williams, 19. “There’s too many of us.”

For protection, the women, who are African American, wore blue rubber gloves but no masks. “We forgot them at home,” said Trinity Williams, 18.

Like millions of Americans, the Williams sisters depend on public transit at a time when health officials have told Americans to stay 6 feet

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KDOT: Public Transportation

Speakers from Transit Day at the Capitol 2019

(clockwise from top) Chris Herrick, Division Director, KDOT; Anne Smith, Executive Director, Flint Hills Area Transportation Agency and Chair of the Kansas Public Transit Association; Sen. Mike Petersen, Chair of Senate Transportation Committee; and Rep. Richard Proehl, Chair of House Transportation Committee were all speakers at this year’s Transit Day at the Capitol.  Please see the link, below, to hear their remarks on how transit and paratransit services support Kansas’ economy, job market, access to education, and increased health outcomes.


KDOT administers public transportation programs funded by the Federal Transit Administration and the State of Kansas. Both the federal and state programs are designed to meet the transportation needs of elderly persons, persons with disabilities, and the general public. KDOT currently supports approximately 145 transit programs covering most of the state’s 105 counties.

8-30-19: Public Transit Call for Projects

The Kansas Department of Transportation issued a call for projects on

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