‘Charm City Kings’ watch party held in Catonsville

HOW THE DIRT-BIKE CULTURE COULD LEAD TO JOBS. >> IS NOT IT? >> THAT’S IT. TRE: SHOWCASING THE DIRTBIKE CULTURE OF BALTIMORE CITY, NOW ON THE SMALL SCREEN. HBO RELEASED THE MOVIE CHARM CITY KINGS, ABOUT A 14-YEAR-OLD BOY WHO WANTS TO JOIN A BIKE GROUP. >> 100% OF THE MOVIE WAS SHOT IN WEST BALTIMORE, SO T ENVIRONMENT IN ITSELF WAS A REALLY GREAT TOOL OF REFERENCE. JUST TO WALK THE STREETS THAT MOUSE WALKED, IF YOU WERE A REAL PERSON, AND TO BE ABLE TO GET ACCUSTOMED WITH THE COMMUNITY. TRE: HOSTING AN OUTSIDE WATCH PARTY IN CATONSVILLE SATURDAY NIGHT, A LOCAL DIRT-BIKE ADVOCACY GROUP, 360 BALTIMORE, IS HOPING THE MOVIE COULD SHED LIGHT ON THE SKILLS RIDERS COULD PROVIDE IN THE STEM INDUSTRY. >> THAT’S REALLY WHAT IT’S ABOUT. BALTIMORE HAS OVER 200,000 STEM CAREERS WHERE YOU DON’T NEED A FOUR-YEAR DEGREE, AND RIDERS KNOW EVERYTHING ABOUT FIXING IT, BREAKING IT DOWN. AND THIS MOVIE ALSO FEATURES SOME OF THAT. TRE: MANY RIDERS, LIKE 14-YEAR-OLD DAMON RAY HARRISON, STARTED OFF AS YOUNG AS FOUR. DAMON SAYS BEING PART OF THE CULTURE BRINGS RIDERS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY TOGETHER. >> LIKE, WE COME TOGETHER AS ONE UNIT, ONE FAMILY. BIKES BRING BONDS, SO YOU GO TO A DIFFERENT CITY, MEET SOMEBODY FROM A BIKE, YOU ALL COULD LINK UP AND DO SOMETHING MORE BETTER AND POWERFUL. THOUGH — TRE: THOUGH SOME RIDERS ARE RAISING ISSUE ABOUT HOW THE MOVIE’S DEPICTION OF THE CULTURE. >> THE SCENES, THE ACTIONS, THE VIOLENCE. BASICALLY SAYING ALL DIRT BIKE RIDERS ARE DODGING CRIMINAL ACTIVITY OR WANT TO BE LOOKED AT IN A NEGATIVE WAY. THAT’S NOT TRUE. TRE: BUT ADVOCATES BELIEVE THE FILM COULD OPEN UP A DIALOGUE IN THE COMMUNITY TO HELP CHANGE LOCAL LAWS AND RID THE NEGATIVE STEREOTYPE OF DIRT BIKE RIDERS. >> AND JUST LIKE WE’VE MADE SPACE FOR PEOPLE TO HAVE SCOOTERS, JUST LIKE WE’VE MADE SPACE FOR SKATEBOARDING, WE NEED TO MAKE SPACE AND MAKE POLICY REFORM FOR THE DIRT BIKE CULTURE, AS WELL, BECAUSE IT’S NOT GOING ANYWHERE. IT’S INGRAINED IN OUR CULTURE. BRITT: — TRE: AND ORGANIZERS SAY THEY DID REACH OUT TO HBO AND HAVE HEARD BACK FROM THE COMPANY. THEY SAY THEY HOPE TO WORK TOGETHER IN THE NE

Groups hope ‘Charm City Kings’ will show how dirt bike culture could lead to jobs


Another Baltimore moment on the big screen has arrived in “Charm City Kings,” a movie about the city’s dirt bike culture.The movie about a 14-year-old boy who wants to join a bike group started streaming this week on HBO, and a group of advocates hopes to show how the dirt bike culture could lead to jobs.”One-hundred percent of the movie was shot in west Baltimore, so the environment in itself was really great tool of reference. Just to walk the streets that Mouse walked, if you were a real person, and to be able to get accustomed with the community,” said Jahi Di’Allo Winston, an actor.Hosting an outside watch party Saturday night in Catonsville, dirt-bike advocacy group B-360 hopes the movie could shed light on the skills riders could provide in the STEM industry.”That’s really what it’s about. Baltimore has over 200,000 STEM careers where you don’t need a four-year degree, and riders know everything about fixing it, breaking it down. This movie also features some of that,” said Brittany Young, founder and CEO of B-360.Many riders, Like 14-year-old Damon Ray Harrison, started off as young as 4. Damon said being part of the culture brings riders from across the country together.”Like, we come together as one unit, one family. Bikes bring bonds, so you go to a different city, meet from a bike, you all could link up and do something more better and powerful,” Damon said.Though, some riders are raising issue about how the movie’s depiction of the culture.”The scenes, the actions, the violence. Basically, saying all dirt bike riders are dodging criminal activity or want to be looked at in a negative way. That’s not true. That’s not true at all,” said Michael Chester, a rider.But advocates believe the film could open up a dialogue in the community to help change local laws and rid the negative stereotype of dirt bike riders.”Just like we’ve made space for people to have scooters, just like we’ve made space for skateboarding, we need to make space and make policy reform for the dirt bike culture, as well, because it’s not going anywhere. It’s ingrained in our culture,” said Rashad Staton, Dirt Bike Task Force, Mayor’s Office.Organizers said they reached out to HBO and have heard back from the company. They said they hope to work together soon.

Another Baltimore moment on the big screen has arrived in “Charm City Kings,” a movie about the city’s dirt bike culture.

The movie about a 14-year-old boy who wants to join a bike group started streaming this week on HBO, and a group of advocates hopes to show how the dirt bike culture could lead to jobs.

“One-hundred percent of the movie was shot in west Baltimore, so the environment in itself was really great tool of reference. Just to walk the streets that Mouse walked, if you were a real person, and to be able to get accustomed with the community,” said Jahi Di’Allo Winston, an actor.

Hosting an outside watch party Saturday night in Catonsville, dirt-bike advocacy group B-360 hopes the movie could shed light on the skills riders could provide in the STEM industry.

“That’s really what it’s about. Baltimore has over 200,000 STEM careers where you don’t need a four-year degree, and riders know everything about fixing it, breaking it down. This movie also features some of that,” said Brittany Young, founder and CEO of B-360.

Many riders, Like 14-year-old Damon Ray Harrison, started off as young as 4. Damon said being part of the culture brings riders from across the country together.

“Like, we come together as one unit, one family. Bikes bring bonds, so you go to a different city, meet from a bike, you all could link up and do something more better and powerful,” Damon said.

Though, some riders are raising issue about how the movie’s depiction of the culture.

“The scenes, the actions, the violence. Basically, saying all dirt bike riders are dodging criminal activity or want to be looked at in a negative way. That’s not true. That’s not true at all,” said Michael Chester, a rider.

But advocates believe the film could open up a dialogue in the community to help change local laws and rid the negative stereotype of dirt bike riders.

“Just like we’ve made space for people to have scooters, just like we’ve made space for skateboarding, we need to make space and make policy reform for the dirt bike culture, as well, because it’s not going anywhere. It’s ingrained in our culture,” said Rashad Staton, Dirt Bike Task Force, Mayor’s Office.

Organizers said they reached out to HBO and have heard back from the company. They said they hope to work together soon.